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Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin) released!

Ubuntu 12.04 LTS released

Ubuntu 12.04 LTS released

Imagination is as vital to any advance in science as learning and precision are essential for starting points. – Percival Lowell

The Ubuntu team is very pleased to announce the release of Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Long-Term Support) for Desktop, Server, Cloud, and Core products.

Codenamed “Precise Pangolin”, 12.04 continues Ubuntu’s proud tradition of integrating the latest and greatest open source technologies into a high-quality, easy-to-use Linux distribution. The team has been hard at work through this cycle, introducing a few new features and improving quality control.

To be a bit more precise about what we’re releasing today…

There are 54 product images and 2 cloud images being shipped with this 12.04 LTS release, with translations available in 41 languages. The Ubuntu project’s 12.04 archive currently has 39,226 binary packages in it, built from 19,179 source packages, so lots of good starting points for your imagination!

For PC users, Ubuntu 12.04 supports laptops, desktops, and netbooks with a unified look and feel based on an updated version of the desktop shell called “Unity”, which introduces “Head-Up Display” search capabilities.

Finding and installing software using the Ubuntu Software Centre is now easier thanks to improvements in speed, search and usability.

Ubuntu Server 12.04 has made it much easier to provision, deploy, host, manage, and orchestrate enterprise data centre infrastructure services with the introduction of new technologies such as “Metal as a Service” (MAAS), the Juju Charm Store, and the latest OpenStack version, codenamed Essex. These technologies further position Ubuntu Server as the best OS for scale-out computing.

Read more about the new features of Ubuntu 12.04 in the following press releases:

http://www.canonical.com/content/ubuntu-server-1204-lts-certified-available-and-ready-hyperscale-world
http://www.canonical.com/content/ubuntu-1204-lts-aims-conquer-enterprise-desktop

Long term support maintenance updates will be provided for Ubuntu 12.04 for five years, through April 2017. For those working on the ARM architecture, an 18 month supported release is also provided for the ARM server using the ARM Hard Float (HF) architecture.

Thanks to the efforts of the global translation community, Ubuntu is now available in 41 languages. For a list of available languages and detailed translation statistics for these and other languages, see:

http://people.canonical.com/~dpm/stats/ubuntu-12.04-translation-stats.html

The newest Kubuntu 12.04 (LTS), Edubuntu 12.04 (LTS), Xubuntu 12.04 (LTS), Mythbuntu 12.04, Lubuntu 12.04 and Ubuntu Studio 12.04 are also being released today. More details can be found in their announcements:

Kubuntu: http://kubuntu.org/news/12.04-release
Xubuntu: http://xubuntu.org/news/12-04-release
Edubuntu: http://edubuntu.org/news/12.04-release
Mythbuntu: http://mythbuntu.org/12.04/release
Lubuntu: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Lubuntu/Announcement/12.04
Ubuntu Studio: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/UbuntuStudio/12.04release_notes

To get Ubuntu 12.04
———————

In order to download Ubuntu 12.04, visit:

http://www.ubuntu.com/download

Users of Ubuntu 11.10 will be offered an automatic upgrade to 12.04 via Update Manager. For further information about upgrading, see:

http://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop/upgrade

As always, upgrades to the latest version of Ubuntu are entirely free of charge.

We recommend that all users read the release notes, which document caveats, workarounds for known issues, as well as more in-depth notes on the release itself. They are available at:

http://www.ubuntu.com/getubuntu/releasenotes

Find out what’s new in this release with a graphical overview:

http://www.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/whats-new
http://www.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/features

If you have a question, or if you think you may have found a bug but aren’t sure, you can try asking in any of the following places:

#ubuntu on irc.freenode.net
http://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
http://www.ubuntuforums.org
http://askubuntu.com

Help Shape Ubuntu
——————–

If you would like to help shape Ubuntu, take a look at the list of ways you can participate at:

http://www.ubuntu.com/community/get-involved

About Ubuntu
—————

Ubuntu is a full-featured Linux distribution for desktops, laptops, netbooks and servers, with a fast and easy installation and regular releases. A tightly-integrated selection of excellent applications is included, and an incredible variety of add-on software is just a few clicks away.

Professional services including support are available from Canonical and hundreds of other companies around the world. For more information about support, visit:

http://www.ubuntu.com/support

More Information
——————

You can learn more about Ubuntu and about this release on our website listed below:

http://www.ubuntu.com

To sign up for future Ubuntu announcements, please subscribe to Ubuntu’s very low volume announcement list at:

http://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-announce

On behalf of the Ubuntu Release Team,
Kate Stewart

Ubuntu Online Tour
——————–

Enjoy the simplicity of Ubuntu’s stylish, intuitive interface. Take Ubuntu for a test drive with our online tour and download when you’re ready!

URL: http://www.ubuntu.com/tour/en/

How to install GIMP 2.8 RC1 on Ubuntu 12.04

GIMP 2.8 on Ubuntu

GIMP 2.8 RC1 was released on April 8, 2012. The details of this new release are on the official site. Here in this article I’ll show how to install GIMP 2.8 on Ubuntu 12.04.

GIMP 2.8 on Ubuntu

Image credit: Ubuntu Vibes

A PPA for GIMP is now available, we’ll use it for easy installation of GIMP 2.8 RC1. Open up your terminal and type the commands given below:

chankey@linuxstall:$ sudo add-apt-repository ppa:otto-kesselgulasch/gimp
chankey@linuxstall:$ sudo apt-get update
chankey@linuxstall:$ sudo apt-get install gimp

and you’re done. GIMP 2.8 RC1 has been successfully installed on your Ubuntu 12.04.

Kubuntu breaks up with Canonical, Blue Systems is the new sponsor

Kubuntu found new home. Kubuntu will now no longer be sponsored by Canonical. The new sponsor of Kubuntu will be Blue Systems. Blue Systems has been there for other KDE projects as well as distros, LinuxMint and NetRunner. They would have to deal with trademark issues which might lead to change in name. If KDE were to acquire a spot in enterprise solution, a new name and branding is what it needs.

Jonathan Riddel said:

“With this new sponsorship we will have the independence to give the project new wings and take the excellent KDE Software to new audiences,”

(Source)

Not so appreciated attitude of Dr. Richard Stallman

DO NOT USE FACEBOOK!

On a mailing list MIT CSAIL, a thread was started by some students asking for votes over facebook as they were competing for a chance to win $100K.

Hi all,

A few MIT current students and alumni (previously on the GPI action team)
are working on an exciting project to help *MIT students and international
development volunteers*! We are competing on Facebook and if we get enough
votes (if we can make 5th place or higher) we have the chance to win $100K!
*It takes 1 minute to vote on Facebook and you can disable the app
immediately after voting!*

We are building *an International Development Project Database and Mentor
Connection** *that gathers detailed information about international service
projects. Future students and volunteers will be able to build upon
previous work (use previous designs, materials) instead of starting from
scratch. Experts and previous volunteers will help students form their
projects and prepare for on the ground work in specific regions.*We would
extremely appreciate your vote!*

Dr. Stallman response tells us that he hates facebook from all his heart. His response can be checked here. He said:

Facebook is not your friend. Its “real name” policy is enough reason to refuse to use it, but there is so much more nastiness in Facebook. I don’t use it, and you shouldn’t either.

He even said:

Facebook is an international parasitism project.

Read full reply here.

He brought up pretty strong points to justify his hatred. What do you say? Leave comments.

How to install eclipse in Linux (CentOS, RHEL, Fedora)

how to install eclipse in linux

Eclipse is an integrated development ennvironment primarily for Java but with the extra plugins it can also be used to develop applications in C, C++, PHP, Scala, etc.

Here we are explaining How to install eclipse on linux. Distros covered are Fedora, CentOS and RHEL.

Download Eclipse

Go to www.eclipse.org/downloads/ and select suitable version according to your needs.

Switch to root

ayush@linuxstall:$ su -

Extracting

We are extracting the Eclipse package into /opt directory.

ayush@linuxstall:$ tar -xvzf eclipse-SDK-3.7.2-linux-gtk.tar.gz -C /opt

Adding read permissions

ayush@linuxstall:$ chmod -R +r /opt/eclipse

Creating executable

ayush@linuxstall:$ touch /usr/bin/eclipse
ayush@linuxstall:$ chmod 755 /usr/bin/eclipse
ayush@linuxstall:$ gedit /usr/bin/eclipse

Paste following code in the file.

 #!/bin/sh
export ECLIPSE_HOME="/opt/eclipse" 
$ECLIPSE_HOME/eclipse $*

You are done!

Microsoft counted as key Linux contributor, for now anyway

For the first time ever, and probably only temporarily, Microsoft can be counted as a key contributor to Linux.

The company, which once portrayed the open-source OS kernel as a form of cancer, has been ranked 17th on a tally of the largest code contributors to Linux.

The Linux Foundation’s Linux Development Report, released Tuesday, summarizes who has contributed to the Linux kernel, from versions 2.6.36 to 3.2. The 10 largest contributors listed in the report are familiar names: Red Hat, Intel, Novell, IBM, Texas Instruments, Broadcom, Nokia, Samsung, Oracle and Google. But the appearance of Microsoft is a new one for the list, compiled annually.

Overall, Microsoft contributed 688 changes, or about 1.0 percent of the accepted changes to the kernel, since version 2.6.36. Company engineers also signed off on 2,174 changes, or about 1.1 percent of all the changes in this review period.

Much of the work Microsoft did centers around providing drivers for its own Hyper-V virtualization technology. Microsoft’s Hyper-V, part of Windows Server, can run Linux as a guest OS. Linux kernel developer and LWN.net editor Jon Corbet, a co-author of the study, estimates that Microsoft’s involvement peaked around last year’s 3.0 release of Linux and will diminish over time. “Even the [hypervisor] drivers can only need so much cleaning up,” he wrote in an article explaining the influx of Microsoft contribution.

For the Linux Foundation, Microsoft’s involvement in Linux shows how widely used the OS kernel is these days. Microsoft must work with Linux to be part of the larger enterprise computing ecosystem.

In the time period covered by the report, more than 1,000 developers from nearly 200 companies contributed to the kernel. Lone contributors provided the largest number of changes, 11,413 changes or about 16.2 percent of all the changes in this review period. Among contributions from companies, Red Hat provided the most changes, or 7,563, or 10.7 percent of all changes. After Red Hat, Intel provided the next largest batch of changes, 5,075, or about 7.2 percent of all changes.

On average, between 8,000 and 12,000 patches are added to each new kernel release, which, overseen by Linus Torvalds, come out every two or three months. The vast majority of these changes are developed by outside parties.

In addition to Corbet, Linux kernel maintainer and Linux Foundation fellow Greg Kroah-Hartman, and Linux Foundation Vice President of Marketing and Developer Services Amanda McPherson co-wrote the report.

The Linux Foundation is a nonprofit organization devoted to further developing and maintaining the open-source Linux kernel. It is funded by companies that use Linux in their products and services, including Hewlett-Packard, IBM, Intel, Novell and Oracle.

GNU/Linux Running On An 8-Bit Processor

linux on 8 bit

Dmitry Grinberg has successfully booted Ubuntu 9.04 on an 8 bit micro machine with 6.5 KHz CPU and 16 MB RAM. Grinberg did this experiment on a ATmega1284p, 8-bit RISC microcontroller clocked at 24MHz and equipped with 16KB of SRAM and 128KB of flash storage. Since the RAM was too low, he added 30-pin 16MB SIMM to the machine and a 1 GB SD card to host Ubuntu image. … To get the world’s slowest Linux Computer running, he had to write an ARMv5 emulator which supports a 32bit processor and MMU. A similar machine can be made very easily and everything should come in about $20.

linux on 8 bit processor

There is source code available, but it’s under a non-commercial use only license. Just how slow is it? “It takes about 2 hours to boot to bash prompt (‘init=/bin/bash’ kernel command line). Then 4 more hours to boot up the entire Ubuntu (‘exec init’ and then login). Starting X takes a lot longer. The effective emulated CPU speed is about 6.5KHz, which is on par with what you’d expect emulating a 32-bit CPU & MMU on a measly 8-bit micro. Curiously enough, once booted, the system is somewhat usable. You can type a command and get a reply within a minute.” If you like watching a whole lot of nothing, there’s a video of the boot process below the fold.