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Take screenshot in Linux with Shutter

Shutter is a free screenshot manager for Linux that can grab your screen, well that’s what every snapshot tool does. Exciting thing about Shutter is that it also allows you to take snapshot of specific area, a particular window or even a website. Right from that window, you can make changes to screenshot to highlight something or draw a pointer to anything you wish. Shutter is written in Perl. Its feature list also includes sending image to photo editors, uploading to websites and auto-thumbnailing.

Shutter is actually 0.7 version of a previously known screenshot manager called GScrot. This Linux only app is of great use to bloggers, technical writers and all those who like showing off their Linux desktop.

How to install Shutter?

Debian / Ubuntu based distro users can execute following command to install Shutter:

user@computer:$ sudo apt-get install shutter

And, for RHEL/Fedora/CentOS users can do it with this command:

user@computer:$ yum install shutter

Screenshot:

Shutter

 

How to start Shutter?

From GUI view, it can be started as follows:

Applications > Accessories > Shutter

Or to do it CLI way, following command will start the app and will grab the whole screen automatically.

shutter --full

To start shutter in window selection mode:

shutter --window

To start in selection mode (in which you can select the part of screen to be grabbed with your mouse):

shutter --selection

To see the help section of shutter:

shutter --help

How to install LibreOffice (3.4.5 and 3.5.0) on Linux (Fedora, RHEL, CentOS)

libreoffice

LibreOffice, no doubt a great office suite, doesn’t come pre-installed with major Linux distributions so here we are explaining how to install Libreoffice 3.4.5 or 3.5 on Fedora, CentOS and RHEL. Well you have a privilege of installing LibreOffice on Fedora 16 through command line. Following code can do the trick :

yum install libreoffice

Above code will install latest version of Libreoffice. We have more than that in the box, tutorial to install different versions of Libreoffice on Fedora, CentOS and RHEL.

Downloading Packages

Libreoffice 3.4.5 32-bit stable version

wget http://download.documentfoundation.org/libreoffice/stable/3.4.5/rpm/x86/LibO_3.4.5_Linux_x86_install-rpm_en-US.tar.gz

LibreOffice 3.4.5 64-bit stable version

wget http://download.documentfoundation.org/libreoffice/stable/3.4.5/rpm/x86_64/LibO_3.4.5_Linux_x86-64_install-rpm_en-US.tar.gz

LibreOffice 3.5.0 RC3 32-bit stable version

wget http://download.documentfoundation.org/libreoffice/testing/3.5.0-rc3/rpm/x86/LibO_3.5.0rc3_Linux_x86_install-rpm_en-US.tar.gz

LibreOffice 3.5.0 RC3 64-bit stable version

wget http://download.documentfoundation.org/libreoffice/testing/3.5.0-rc3/rpm/x86_64/LibO_3.5.0rc3_Linux_x86-64_install-rpm_en-US.tar.gz

Switch to root

su -

OR

sudo -i

Extract Libreoffice downloaded packages

Libreoffice 3.4.5

tar -xvf LibO_3.4.5_*

Libreoffice 3.5.0

tar -xvf LibO_3.5.0*

Installation

LibreOffice 3.4.5

cd LibO_3.4.5*
rpm -Uvh RPMS/*.rpm
rpm -Uvh RPMS/desktop-integration/libreoffice3.4-redhat-menus-3.4*.noarch.rpm

Libreoffice 3.5.0

cd LibO_3.5.0*
rpm -Uvh RPMS/*.rpm
rpm -Uvh RPMS/desktop-integration/libreoffice3.5-freedesktop-menus-3.5*.noarch.rpm

..and you are done!

How to automount partition in Linux: GUI style

Automount partition in linux like never before. Introducing a tool that can automount partition for you as soon as you boot up your linux box.

One of the Linux Guru’s characteristics is to use command line for everything. One can accomplish anything when well versed with command line tips. After booting up a linux box, one needs to manually mount the partitions. Its not a big deal but it gets really annoying when you keep getting error just because you forgot to mount a partition. This hassle can be avoided by making partitions to automount themselves. It can be accomplished by editing few system files but we are not going there. This post is for those ‘lazy’ ones who don’t want to trouble themselves with system files and all, here we are going to automount partition in graphical manner. We have a tool available that can automount partition right after booting.

PySDM: PyGTK Storage Device Manager

PySDM is a Storage Device Manager that is widely used by users to automount partition without touching fstab. Read more about it here.

PySDM for Ubuntu

Download PySDM to automount partition in Ubuntu and other Debian based distros by executing following command.

user@computer:$ sudo apt-get install pysdm

 

PySDM for Fedora

Download PySDM to automount partition in RHEL/CentOS/Fedora by executing following command:

user@computer:$ sudo yum install pysdm

 

PySDM for Arch Linux

Download PySDM to automount partition in Arch linux, link: https://aur.archlinux.org/packages.php?ID=16992

When you are done with downloading, start the tool by shooting following command in terminal as a root:

user@computer:$ sudo pysdm

A prompt for password will appear, past that you will see following window with partitions listed on the left:

 automount partition pysdm

Click on Assistant button and following window will appear.

automount partition pysdm

Now you can check and uncheck according to your preferences and you are done, PySDM will now automount partition for you just after booting.

Actual meaning of Free Software: Free as in beer versus Free as in speech

Vastness of open source can leave anyone in confusion. Whether it is distro hunting or phrases that are used to explain related concepts. The one which annoys every single beginner is that Open source is said to distribute free software, so far so good, but what exactly we mean by free? Free as is Beer or Free as in Speech? Keep reading.

The difference can be narrowed down to “no money” versus “no restrictions (or a bit of them)”. In English, free is often mistaken for both the meanings but in Spanish they have different words for them, Gratis and Libre.

Free as in Beer (Gratis)

Java from Oracle is a product which is free as in beer. When you are offered a beer, you are not supposed to pay for it but enjoy. The ‘body’ giving away pays for it and everyone enjoys it at no cost.

Java from Oracle is available free of cost for everyone but restricts users from getting even a glimpse of source code. Hence, users are also deprived of the liberty of modifying the code. Speaking of that, none of distributing publicly and submitting bug fixes is available. The decision of What/When/How you get the “beer” is made by the “giver”.

Free as in Speech (libre)

In addition to facility of getting the software for free, the air of liberty comes in. The liberty in “libre” is more than you get in “gratis”. Following are the rights you have in software which are Free as in Speech:

♦ You can use it anyway you want. They don’t care if the software was made for computer you are running it on mobile device. More the merrier!

♦ You can easily see the internal working of the software. Users want to know the secret ingredients in their favourite beer but are deprived of this pleasure in case of free beer.

♦ Sharing is caring! After using and falling in love with the software, one would definitely want to share it and libre allows him to do that without violating any law. Distribute it publicly whether by packaging it with your software or provide a mirror, etc.

♦ You can be a part of the development process. If you find a bug and a fix to it, you can submit it so that community benefits from it. After all it is all about giving away.